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Publications and Guides

2015 Point in Time Study

Oklahoma City conducted its annual Point In Time count of the homeless on Thursday, January 29, 2015. The intention of this one-day survey was to determine the total number of people experiencing homelessness in Oklahoma City and gather information about their characteristics and needs. It should be noted that a one day count is only a snapshot and is not designed to be a complete analysis of the issues surrounding homelessness. Download and view the entire study HERE.

The Cost of Homelessness in OKC April 1, 2009 to March 31, 2010

In the summer of 2009, the City of Oklahoma City Planning Department hired Spangler & Associates, Inc., to conduct a study with a limited scope and one over-riding goal: to determine how much is spent on services for the homeless population in Oklahoma City by both public and private entities. This was done at the behest of the Mayor’s Homelessness Action Task Force as a part of their work on the 10 Year Plan to Create Lasting Solutions Update and to better inform the community of what the annual cost of serving our homeless population is. Download and view the etire report HERE.

Oklahoma City's 10 Year Plan to End Homelessness

The original Homes for the Homeless – 10 Year Plan to Create Lasting Solutions was adopted by the City Council in 2004. The plan was created by the Coalition for the Needy, comprised ofshelter and service providers, government agencies and City staff, and has been used to

coordinate and focus efforts to take strategic, high-impact action steps to decrease homelessness in Oklahoma City. The plan, reviewed and updated annually, included the following key goals: increase the supply of Permanent Supportive Housing; develop a centralized intake center (WestTown Resource Center); improve transportation for homeless persons; develop and enforce minimum standards for all shelter and housing programs; create a database (Homeless Management Information System), implement performancebased

funding and evaluation of service providers; and expedite benefits enrollment for all eligible homeless persons. Download and view the entire plan HERE.

Characteristics of Transitional Housing for Homeless Families

When homelessness first impressed itself on the national consciousness in the early 1980s, there was no such thing as transitional housing for homeless people. Even emergency shelters were few and far between, being run mostly by missions in run-down areas of big cities and accommodating mostly single men. The first expansion of homeless assistance took the form of more emergency shelter capacity. Only after several years of experience with people using emergency shelters did it become obvious that for some people emergency shelter would not be enough to help them leave homelessness for good. This recognition led to application of transitional and permanent supportive housing concepts to the field of homelessness.

Characteristics of Transitional Housing Programs for Homeless Families 2

Chapter 1: Introduction and Methods Most transitional housing programs for homeless people that exist today specialize in serving households with serious enough barriers to getting or keeping housing that a period of stabilization, learning, and planning appear needed if they are ultimately to leave homelessness and stay housed. These households may already have some history of leaving homelessness for housing but not being able to maintain the housing, or they may have characteristics that are known to lower the probability of being able to maintain housing without supports. Download and view the entire report HERE.

Report by Martha Burt and Urban Institute (www.urban.org

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